New York

New York

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

 

AI WEIWEI: ACCORDING TO WHAT? AT THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM

APRIL 18, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 10, 2014

Foreground, “Colored Vases” (2007–10) / Background, “Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn” (1995) - Ai Weiwei

Foreground, “Colored Vases” (2007–10) / Background, “Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn” (1995) – Ai Weiwei

This is the first major exhibition in the United States devoted to Ai Weiwei, one of the world’s most controversial and iconoclastic contemporary artists, showcasing his remarkable interdisciplinary career as an architect, conceptualist, photographer, sculptor and activist. Comprising thirty works of art which explore universal themes of culture, freedom, history, politics and tradition often expressed through the lens Weiwei’s Chinese identity, the exhibition features examples from the artist’s oeuvre created over a span of more than twenty years drawn from museum collections around the world including early experiments like, “Profile of Marcel Duchamp in a Coat Hanger,” (1986) to iconic pieces like the photographic triptych, “Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn,” (1995), the installations, “Bowls of Pearls,” (2006), “Colored Vases,” (2007–10), “Moon Chest,” (2008) and “River Crabs,” (2010), the sculptures, “Map of China,” (2008) and, “Straight,” (2008–12) and the set of six intricate dioramas, “S.A.C.R.E.D.,” (2011-13) that document the most intimate and painful moments of the artist’s eighty-one-day imprisonment by Chinese authorities in 2011, including the first time he was led into his cell, an interrogation and the everyday activities of bathing, eating, sleeping and using the toilet, all under the eyes of two ever watchful guards.

SWOON: SUBMERGED MOTHERLANDS AT THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM

APRIL 11, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 24, 2014

For this exhibition, the Brooklyn based artist Swoon who explores environmental and social issues in her work and is best known for her intricately-cut, oversize prints wheat pasted to industrial buildings in Brooklyn and Manhattan, has created a site-specific installation in the museum’s rotunda gallery. A response to catastrophic Hurricane Sandy as well as the destruction of, “Doggerland,” an historic landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe drowned under a tsunami 8,000 years ago, the artist has created a fantastical landscape complete with a monumental sculptural tree at its center surrounded by carved boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings and cut paper foliage at its base.

CHICAGO IN L.A.: JUDY CHICAGO’S EARLY WORK, 1963–74 AT THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM

APRIL 4, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 28, 2014

“Birth Hood” (1965) - Judy Chicago

“Birth Hood” (1965) – Judy Chicago

Sixty drawings, paintings, photographs, prints, sculptures and videos survey the significant early work produced by feminist artist Judy Chicago when she lived in Los Angeles during the late sixties and early seventies. Not only do the selections showcase Chicago’s importance as a pioneer of the California art scene but the installation as a whole places these experimental yet seminal pieces within the arc of the artist’s broader production, particularly their influence on her masterpiece, “The Dinner Party,” (1979), the centerpiece of the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. On view are important early sculptures, including, “Rainbow Picket,” (1964) and, “3.5.5 Acrylic Shapes,” (1967), which blend minimalist forms and bold color choices as well as a range of vibrant paintings and sculptures made with sprayed acrylic lacquer, a material typically used for decorating cars that the artist mastered as the only woman in an auto shop class during the early sixties such as, “Birth Hood,” (1965), “Fresno Fans Series,” (1971), “Heaven is for White Men Only,” (1973), “Through the Flower,” (1973) and “Rejection Quintet,” (1974).

REVOLUTION! WORKS FROM THE BLACK ARTS MOVEMENT AT THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM

ONGOING

This exhibit debuts seven recently acquired works including Wadsworth A. Jarrell’s iconic 1971 painting, “Revolutionary (Angela Davis),” produced as part of the Black Arts Movement, which germinated in the U.S. during the late sixties as the cultural expression of Black Power politics. Rejecting the dominance of the largely white mainstream art establishments that undervalued their work as black artists, members created strong and vibrant images as part of a radical, alternative, artistic movement based on self-governing social and political ideologies rather than the narrow aesthetic dictates of conventional arts institutions.

ENLIGHTENMENT AND BEAUTY: SCULPTURES BY HOUDON AND CLODION AT THE FRICK COLLECTION

APRIL 1, 2014 THROUGH APRIL 5, 2015

“Comtesse du Cayla” (1777) - Jean-Antoine Houdon

“Comtesse du Cayla” (1777) – Jean-Antoine Houdon

This exhibition features seven lively terracottas by Claude Michel, known as Clodion and seven exquisite marbles by Jean-Antoine Houdon, the two leading French sculptors of the late eighteenth century, highlighting their defining contributions to the art of the Enlightenment. Inspired by the great works of Classical antiquity as well as from the close observation of life, the installation features selections from the permanent collection which are grouped together for the first time in the natural light of the museum’s magnificent Portico Gallery including Clodion’s terracotta statuettes, “The Dance of Time: Three Nymphs Supporting a Clock,” (1788) and “Zephyrus and Flora,” (1799) and Houdon’s marble busts of the, “Comtesse du Cayla,” (1777) and the, “Marquis de Miromesnil,” (1777) presented alongside examples from private collections which are rarely publicly displayed.

ITALIAN FUTURISM, 1909 – 1944: RECONSTRUCTING THE UNIVERSE AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

FEBRUARY 21, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 1, 2014

"The City Rises" (1910) - Boccioni

“The City Rises” (1910) – Boccioni

The first comprehensive overview of Italian Futurism ever to be presented in the United States, “Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe,” is a multidisciplinary exhibition presenting 300 works encompassing not only painting and sculpture but also advertising, architecture, ceramics, design, fashion, film, music, performance, photography, poetry, publications and theater. Examining the historical sweep of the movement from its inception with F. T. Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto in 1909 through its demise at the end of World War II, the display features works by all its major creators and proponents including painters Giacomo Balla, Benedetta, Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, Tullio Crali, Fillia, Ivo Pannaggi, Osvaldo Peruzzi, Ugo Pozzo, Luigi Russolo and Gino Severini, architects Mario Chiattone and Antonio Sant’Elia, decorative artist Fortunato Depero and photographers Mario Bellusi, Piero Boccardi, Anton Giulio Bragaglia, Filippo Masoero and Tato.

UNDER THE SAME SUN: ART FROM LATIN AMERICA TODAY AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

JUNE 13, 2014 THROUGH OCTOBER 1, 2014

Featuring 50 works in a wide variety of media created by 40 artists and collaborative duos from 15 countries across Central America, South America and the Caribbean, this exhibition explores the state of contemporary art in Latin America, investigating the creative responses of artists to complex, shared realities that have been influenced by colonial and modern histories, repressive governments, economic crises, and social inequality, as well as by concurrent periods of regional economic wealth, development and progress. Comprised of works produced from the 1970s up until the present day, the display surveys a range of artistic responses by a roster of artists including Argentine Marta Minujín, Brazilian duo Paulo Bruscky and Daniel Santiago, Chileans Juan Downey and Alfredo Jaar, Columbian Raimond Chaves, Cuban Wilfredo Prieto, Mexicans Mariana Castillo Deball and Mario García Torres, Puerto Rican Rafael Ferrer and many more.

KANDINSKY BEFORE ABSTRACTION AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

JUNE 27, 2014–SPRING 2015

Drawn from the Guggenheim’s own Kandinsky holdings, considered the finest in the world, this intimate presentation of paintings and woodcuts dating from approximately 1895 to 1913, highlight the artist’s earliest works and the role they played in the evolution of his later iconic abstract style. The woodcut in particular, which challenged artists to capture the essence of their vision or story through a reduced means of expression, provided Kandinsky with an initial vehicle for articulating his representations in a less figurative manner than that required by a canvas and paint. Included in the display are prints that capture scenes of the artist’s childhood in Russia, folkloric stories and pure fantasy as well as Bavarian landscape paintings which employ techniques translated from woodcuts including such graphic elements as clearly delineated forms, flattened perspectives and the use of monochrome black-and-white as, “noncolors,” which by 1913 allowed the artist to move completely away from his pictorial beginnings and embrace abstraction, reducing his works to broad areas of bright, radiant color that were subsidiary to the expressive qualities of line.

A TRIBUTE TO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S USONIAN HOUSE AND PAVILION AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

ONGOING

This presentation, composed of selected materials including drawings, models, photos and renderings pays tribute to two temporary Frank Lloyd Wright-designed buildings constructed in 1953 on the current site of the Guggenheim Museum.  Consisting of a pavilion made of glass, fiberboard and pipe columns and a 1,700-square-foot, fully furnished, Usonian house representing Wright’s organic solution for a modest, middle-class dwelling, they served as an introduction to the architect’s ideas about design and were the first and only Wright designed buildings in New York until the museum was built.

SELECTIONS FROM THE THANNHAUSER COLLECTION AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

ONGOING

This exhibition presents highlights from the Thannhauser bequest of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art in a gallery dedicated to a display of examples from the bequest. On view are significant masterpieces including Cézanne’s, “Still Life: Flask, Glass, and Jug,” from 1877, Gauguin’s, “Haere Mai,” from 1891, Manet’s, “Woman in Evening Dress,” from 1880, Monet’s, “The Palazzo Ducale, Seen from San Giorgio Maggiore,” from 1908,  Picasso’s, “Woman with Yellow Hair,” from 1931, Renoir’s, “Woman with a Parrot,” from 1871 and van Gogh’s, “Landscape with Snow,” from 1888.

OUT OF CHARACTER: DECODING CHINESE CALLIGRAPHY: SELECTIONS FROM THE COLLECTION OF AKIKO YAMAZAKI AND JERRY YANG AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

APRIL 29, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 17, 2014

"The Thousand-Character Classic (Detail)" (1561) - Wen Peng

“The Thousand-Character Classic (Detail)” (1561) – Wen Peng

This exhibition presents the opportunity to explore more than forty outstanding examples of calligraphy by leading artists of the Yuan (1271–1368), Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) dynasties from the private collection of Jerry Yang and Akiko Yamazaki. Using calligraphy of the highest quality, the display introduces key concepts of appreciation of format, script type and style through exceptional works such as a, “Buddhist Sutra,” in a standard script transcription by Zhao Mengfu (1254–1322), an eighty-five-leaf  album of, “The Thousand-Character Classic,” in a clerical script transcription by Wen Peng (1498–1573), cursive writings by Ming General Xiong Tingbi (1569–1625), selections by the preeminent calligrapher, painter, and art theorist of the late Ming dynasty Dong Qichang (1555–1636) plus an important group of nineteenth-century pieces by masters of the, “Epigraphic School,” who based their calligraphy on the archaic scripts found on bronze vessels and stone steles.

MAKING POTTERY ART: THE ROBERT A. ELLISON JR. COLLECTION OF FRENCH CERAMICS, 1880–1910 AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

FEBRUARY 4, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 18, 2014

"Flask with Face" (1890) - Jean-Joseph Carriès

“Flask with Face” (1890) – Jean-Joseph Carriès

This exhibition presents the recently acquired Robert A. Ellison Jr. Collection of European Art Pottery which is comprised of works produced during a period when French potters created technically experimental and aesthetically ambitious vases that revolutionized and expanded the boundaries of the ceramic medium. Works of imposing size in stunning shapes finished in dazzling glazes by the master ceramists of the period including Jean Carriès, Ernest Chaplet, Pierre-Adrien Dalpayrat, Albert-Louis Dammouse, Auguste Delaherche, Paul Gauguin, Hector Guimard and Georges Hoentschel are displayed with other works that served as inspirations ranging from Asian ceramics to German stoneware.

UNIQUE BY DESIGN: CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY IN THE DONNA SCHNEIER COLLECTION AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

MAY 13, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 31, 2014

This exhibition provides a close and complete look at more than eighty individual pieces donated to the Met in 2007 by collector Donna Schneier, dating from the 1960s to the present, designed by some eighty artists from seventeen countries, including examples by modern master jewelers such as Gijs Bakker, Manfred Bischoff, Peter Chang, Thomas Gentille, William Harper, Mary Lee Hu and Hermann Junger as well as avant-garde artist/jewelers Robert Baines, David Bielander, Lola Brooks, Attai Chen and Ted Noten, all of whom have contributed to the creative revolution in contemporary jewelry design. A collection that documents the central figures and works of this revolutionary era in jewelry design when makers broke tradition by questioning the use of precious materials and art jewelry entered a phase of critical introspection and material exploration on an international scale, highlights of the exhibition include the, “Monte Fiascone Brooch,” by Manfred Bischoff, the, “Raw Diamond and Oxidized-Silver Ring,” by Karl Fritsch and the, “Ebony and Eggshell Brooch,” by Thomas Gentille plus several pieces by David Bielander whose pieces mix copper-anodized silver and elastic polymer and Attai Chen who makes jewelry from paper, linen, coal and paint.

LUCAS SAMARAS: OFFERINGS FROM A RESTLESS SOUL AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

FEBRUARY 24, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 1, 2014

"Box #10" (1963) - Lucas Samaras

“Box #10″ (1963) – Lucas Samaras

This exhibition presents the work of contemporary artist Lucas Samaras, a compulsively productive filmmaker, painter, performer, photographer, sculptor and writer, drawn from substantial holdings already in the permanent collection augmented by a a group of additional works from a donation recently made by the artist personally which are making their public debut. Featuring sixty selections dating created from the 1960s to the present, in a two-part installation designed in collaboration with Samaras who painted the galleries with original decorations specially for this exhibit, the display includes examples that highlight the arc of the artist’s career, from his early, whimsical pastels and imaginative box constructions that open to reveal fantastic, sparkling objects in many hidden compartments to his later, innovative, geometric collages composed of fabric scraps and self portraits and panoramas that employ Polaroid photography to manipulate images into, “Photo Transformations,” to his iconoclastic paintings and drawings and more recent evolution into the use of computer-generated imagery.

ITALIAN RENAISSANCE DRAWINGS FROM THE ROBERT LEHMAN COLLECTION AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

MAY 13, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 1, 2014

Seldom displayed Renaissance masterpieces on paper from Central and Southern Italy created during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries are featured in this assortment of drawings selected from the Met’s Robert Lehman Collection. Among the forty-two works included in the display, Florentine drawings are especially well represented including by celebrated Renaissance masters like Leonardo da Vinci while among the Southern Italian examples, a sheet attributed to Antonello da Messina is among the most exceptional.

NOW YOU SEE IT: PHOTOGRAPHY AND CONCEALMENT AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

MARCH 31, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 1, 2014

This exhibition presents a selection of both early and contemporary photographs and video from the permanent collection by a diverse roster of artists including Dianne Arbus, Lutz Bacher, Thomas Demand, Mishka Henner, Vera Lutter, Jack Pierson, Miguel Rio Branco, Fazal Sheikh and Taryn Simon that explore the medium’s dynamic interplay between concealment and revelation, publicity and privacy and the simultaneous desire to be looked at and to evade the merciless gaze of the camera. Among the notable examples are Thomas Demand’s meticulous re-creation of a storeroom in which thirty missing works of art were discovered, Mishka Henner’s images of stylishly censored high-security sites on Google Earth, Vera Lutter’s majestic view of the interior of a Pepsi bottling plant, Grace Ndiritu’s video that explores the tradition of the veil and its complex contrast of exposure and effacement, Miguel Rio Branco’s lush image of the seams on a tapestry’s underside and Fazal Sheikh’s aerial photographs of the Negev desert in southern Israel which record the traces of Bedouin villages that have been transformed into forests or farmland.

THE FLOWERING OF EDO PERIOD PAINTING: JAPANESE MASTERWORKS FROM THE FEINBERG COLLECTION AT THE METROPLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

FEBRUARY 1, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 7, 2014

"Race at the Uji Bridge" (1760–67) - Soga Shohaku

“Race at the Uji Bridge” (1760–67) – Soga Shohaku

This exhibition presents a rare opportunity to view ninety paintings, hanging scrolls and folding screens drawn from the holdings of noted American collectors Robert and Betsy Feinberg, who have put together one of the premiere private collections of Japanese Edo painting. Comprising many masterpieces of the genre, the display provides not only the opportunity for viewers to appreciate works that are not ordinarily on public view but also to discover how Japanese painting evolved from the traditional modes of the orthodox output of the Tosa and Kano ateliers that dominated artistic production in the late medieval period to new, exuberant styles of the Rinpa, Nanga, Maruyama-Shijo and Ukiyo-e schools that thrived as the Edo period reached its apex.

GARRY WINOGRAND AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

June 27, 2014 through September 21, 2014

Bringing together 175 images captured by Garry Winogrand,  renowned photographer of New York City from the 1950s through the 1980s, this is the first major retrospective of the artist’s work in 25 years providing a rigorous survey of the his complete working life, revealing the unique way he captured the full sweep of mid-twentieth century American life over the arc of his singular career. Included in the selections on display are many of Winogrand’s most iconic photographs from images of famous actors, athletes, captains of industry and politicians to hippies, soldiers, antiwar demonstrators and the construction workers who beat them bloody in view of the police to airports, cars, rodeos and zoo animals to everyday men and women on the street. Among the installations most unique examples are a trove of unseen prints chosen from the 6,600 rolls of film left undeveloped when Winogrand died suddenly in 1984 as well as the artist’s famed series of photos shot at the Metropolitan Museum in 1969 when the Museum celebrated its centennial.

THE NELSON A. ROCKEFELLER VISION: IN PURSUIT OF THE BEST IN THE ARTS OF AFRICA, OCEANIA AND THE AMERICAS AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

OCTOBER 8, 2013 THROUGH OCTOBER 5, 2014

"Mblo Twin Mask (Nda)" (19th - 20th century) - Ivory Coast

“Mblo Twin Mask (Nda)” (19th – 20th century) – Ivory Coast

This exhibition highlights 50 masterpieces and a trove of unpublished documents selected from the more than 3,000 works in the Metropolitan Museum of Art gifted by Nelson Rockefeller. The display features not only a selection of historically significant pieces first displayed in Rockefeller’s Museum of Primitive Art whose collection is now housed in the Met’s Michael Rockefeller wing including a tenth century A.D., stone sculpture of a, “Hunchback,” from Mexico, a thirteenth century A.D., “Feathered Tunic,” from Peru and a nineteenth century, “Mblo Twin Mask (Nda)” from the Ivory Coast, but also celebrates his singular appreciation of indigenous arts and honors his vision that the cultural and creative importance of art from Africa, Oceania and the Americas equals anything in the Western art canon.

SELECTIONS FROM THE COLLECTION OF JEFFERSON R. BURDICK AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

APRIL 25, 2014 THROUGH OCTOBER 5, 2014

An integral part of the Met’s collection of ephemera that tell the history of popular printmaking in the United States, the Burdick baseball card collection is the most comprehensive collection outside of the collection held by the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. Dating from 1887 to 1959, the cards on view document the history of baseball from the dead-ball era at the turn of the twentieth century, to the golden age of the twenties and thirties to the modern, Post-War era of the sport.

BASHFORD DEAN AND THE CREATION OF THE ARMS AND ARMOR DEPARTMENT AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

OCTOBER 2, 2012 THROUGH OCTOBER 13, 2014

In celebration of the centennial of the Arms and Armor department’s establishment and of the tenure of Dr. Bashford Dean, its founding curator, this exhibit offers a display of 60 recent acquistions and the unveiling of all new, larger, more legible labeling throughout the Arms and Armor galleries. Also included are historic photos that document Dr. Dean’s career at the museum and in the field.

THE PRE-RAPHAELITE LEGACY: BRITISH ART AND DESIGN AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

MAY 20, 2014 THROUGH OCTOBER 26, 2014

Directing fresh attention to the Met’s exceptional although relatively unknown Pre-Raphaelite holdings, thirty objects highlight the second generation of the Pre-Raphaelite artists, particularly Edward Burne-Jones, Frederic, Lord Leighton, Ford Madox Brown, William Morris and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, all of whom rejected academic practices of the late nineteenth century as stilted and stifling and instead, inspired by medieval and early Renaissance art from before the era of Raphael, strove to produce work that was vivid and sincere. A selection of paintings including Rossetti’s, “Lady Lilith,” (1867), Jones’s, “The Love Song,” (1868-77), Brown’s, “The Convalescent,” (1872) and Leighton’s, “Lachrymae,” (1894-95),  complimented by Morris’s book illustrations from, “The Well at World’s End,” (1898) as well as examples of ceramics, drawings, furniture, stained glass and textiles dating from the 1860s through the 1890s, demonstrate the enduring impact of Pre-Raphaelite ideals as they were adapted by a variety of artists and explored across a range of media.

THE ROOF GARDEN COMMISSION: DAN GRAHAM WITH GÜNTHER VOGT AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

APRIL 29, 2014 THROUGH NOVEMBER 2, 2014

This installation comprised of curves of steel and two-way mirrored glass set between ivy hedgerows is the second in a new series of Met commissions for site specific works on the Roof Garden, one of museum’s most impressive spaces with its panoramic view over Central Park. Calling to mind a garden maze with a modernist skyscraper facade and a funhouse interior, this work explores the act of looking by transforming those who enter into performers glimpsing at their own reflections.

EARLY AMERICAN GUITARS: THE INSTRUMENTS OF C. F. MARTIN AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

JANUARY 14, 2014 THROUGH DECEMBER 7, 2014

“C. F. Martin Guitar.” (1859)

“C. F. Martin Guitar.” (1859)

This exhibit celebrates the lasting contributions of C.F. Martin to American guitar making through a display of thirty-five instruments from Met’s own collection as well as loans from the Martin Museum in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, and several private collections. The evolution of the objects in the exhibition mirror Martin’s own journey as he encounters the Spanish-style guitar in the United States after immigrating from Austria during the mid nineteenth century and then incorporates elements from that tradition into his own Viennese style of instrument construction, resulting in a new form of the guitar and a style that would become important as a basis for other American makers that followed.

RAGAMALA: PICTURING SOUND AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

JUNE 14, 2014 THROUGH DECEMBER 14, 2014

This display of South Asian paintings and musical instruments celebrates, “Ragas,” an Indian musical mode explored as a theme by painters during the eighteenth and nineteenth century. Capturing the essence or flavor of particular ragas as a parallel art form, these suites of paintings portraying the characters of a hero and a heroine, whose emotional states are presented in imagery related to songs of the seasons, evocatively express the intersection of art, music and poetry of the Indian royal courts.

FABERGÉ FROM THE MATILDA GEDDINGS GRAY FOUNDATION COLLECTION AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

LONG-TERM INSTALLATION

This selection of works by fabled Carl Fabergé from the sumptuous collection of Matilda Geddings Gray, considered among the finest in the world, are on long-term loan at the museum and are the first Fabergé pieces exhibited publically in New York in almost a decade Works on view include fabulous examples originally commissioned by and created for the Romanov family like three, magnificent “Imperial Easter Eggs” plus the exquisite “Lilies-of-the-Valley Basket”, considered the most important single Fabergé item in a US collection.

LYGIA CLARK: THE ABANDONMENT OF ART, 1948–1988 AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

MAY 10, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 24, 2014

The first comprehensive exhibition in North America devoted to seminal Brazilian artist Lygia Clark, this major retrospective features 300 works created between the 1940s and her death in 1988, bringing together all parts of her radical production and reintroducing her influential work to modern audiences. A leading abstract artist who drew inspiration from her own extensive psychoanalysis and advocated for the therapeutic qualities of art, the display is organized around three key themes, “Abstraction,” “Neo-Concretism,” and the, “Abandonment of Art,” and is presented across four galleries including those dedicated to painting, sculpture, film and installations. Among the many highlights are examples of the artist’s early geometric abstract paintings, the small metal sculptures from the early 1960s she called, “Bichos,” (Critters) and particularly the participatory works from the 1970s meant to be handled, worn and interacted with which come alive during demonstrations by museum facilitators within the galleries.

MOMA ART LAB: MOVEMENT AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

OCTOBER 10, 2013, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 31, 2014

From artworks that suggest motion to objects that actually move to the gestures artists make when creating art, this interactive exhibit invites visitors to discover different kinds of movement in art. At MoMA Art Lab, you can play with balance while making a mobile, create a stop-motion animation, experiment with performance art and engage in other hands-on activities.

REGRETS, JASPER JOHNS AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

MARCH 15, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 1, 2014

This exhibition premieres Jasper Johns’s most recent body of work, a cohesive group of two paintings, 10 drawings, and two prints created over the last year and a half inspired by an old photograph of the artist Lucian Freud holding his right hand to his forehead in a gesture of weariness or despair. Moved not only by the scene but also by the damaged appearance of the photograph itself, Johns has manipulated the image into a succession of permutations, inscribing the title and signature, “Regrets, Jasper Johns” on each of the pieces, calling to mind a feeling of sadness or disappointment although the words are not without irony because Johns borrowed them from a rubber stamp he had made several years ago to decline the plethora of requests and invitations that come his way. Seen as a whole, the series reveals the importance of experimentation in Johns’s art, laying bare the cycle of dead ends and fresh starts, the way problems and solutions develop from one work to another, and the incessant interplay of materials, meaning, and representation so characteristic of all his work over the last 60 years.

ROBERT HEINECKEN: OBJECT MATTER AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

MARCH 15, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 7, 2014

This exhibition, the first retrospective of the groundbreaking work of photographer Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathers over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, in particular the largest display to date of his celebrated altered magazines, many of them never seen before in New York. A photographer who celebrated photography’s limitless permutations and possibilities, the display also highlights Heinecken’s extended photographic processes and explorations of lithography, collage, photo-based painting as well as sculpture and installation in his examinations of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence that was often humorous and always provocative. Using pictures in books, magazines, pornography, television and even consumer items such as TV dinners as inspiration, he used found images to explore not only the commercialization of daily life by the mass media but also the relationship between the original and a copy, both in art and in American culture at large.

FLOTSAM/JETSAM: PATTY CHANG AND DAVID KELLEY AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

MARCH 15, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 28, 2014

Combining documentary and narrative forms, this filmed work examining the relationship between landscape and identity in the midst of the construction of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River which displaced more than one million people, is inspired by a broad collection of sources including Chairman Mao’s much-publicized swims in the river, Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, journalistic accounts of China’s rapid economic development and Western ideas about Asian modernization. The film details the fabrication of a large submarine, its launch on the Yangtze with a crew of local actors and its progress through a hydroelectric dam to a reservoir while along the journey, performances are enacted, dreams are recounted during a psychotherapy session in a swimming pool and a play is filmed in a ship factory to elicit submerged realities both literal and symbolic.

SITES OF REASON: A SELECTION OF RECENT ACQUISITIONS AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

JUNE 11, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 28, 2014

The exhibition brings together recently acquired works by two generations of contemporary artists, including Hanne Darboven, Liz Deschenes, Peter Downsbrough Charles Gaines, Simryn Gill, Sol LeWitt, Matt Mullican, Seth Price, Emily Roysdon, Allen Ruppersberg and Richard Serra with Nancy Holt. Inspired by a line in Gertrude Stein’s groundbreaking prose work, “Tender Buttons,” (1914), the installation presents works that explore aesthetic, ideological and social systems using visual vocabularies consisting of images, text, gestures, voice and hybrids of all of these.

DESIGNING MODERN WOMEN 1890 – 1990 AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

OCTOBER 5, 2013 THROUGH OCTOBER 1, 2014

Drawn entirely from MoMA’s collection, this installation celebrates the diversity and vitality of individual women artists’ engagement with the modern world, from Loïe Fuller’s pulsating turn-of-the-century performances to April Greiman’s 1980s computer-generated graphics, at the vanguard of early digital design. Highlights include furniture and designs by Lilly Reich, Eileen Gray, Eva Zeisel, Ray Eames, Lella Vignelli, and Denise Scott Brown, textiles by Anni Albers and Eszter Haraszty, ceramics by Lucy Rie, a display of 1960s psychedelic concert posters by graphic designer Bonnie Maclean,  a never-before-seen selection of posters and graphic material from the punk era plus the first display of a newly conserved kitchen created in 1952 by Charlotte Perriand with Le Corbusier for the Unité d’Habitation housing project.

A WORLD OF ITS OWN: PHOTOGRAPHIC PRACTICES IN THE STUDIO AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

FEBRUARY 8, 2014 THROUGH OCTOBER 5, 2014

Exploring the ways in which photographers and other artists using photography have worked and experimented within their studios, this exhibition features both new acquisitions and selections from the MoMA permanent collection that have not been on view in recent years. A groundbreaking survey of manipulated captured images from the inception of photography to the present, the display presents a range of photographs, films and videos by artists such as Berenice Abbott, Richard Avedon, Uta Barth, Zeke Berman, Walead Beshty, Karl Blossfeldt, Constantin Brancusi, Geta Br?tescu, Francis Bruguière, Harry Callahan, Julia Margaret Cameron, Harold Edgerton, Robert Frank, Jan Groover, Barbara Kasten, Robert Mapplethorpe, Christian Marclay, Eadweard Muybridge, Bruce Nauman, Paul Outerbridge, Irving Penn, Adrian Piper, Man Ray, Cindy Sherman, Edward Steichen, William Wegman, and Edward Weston whose constructed and manipulated images serve as a counterpoint to the documentary and improvisational images of street photography.

A COLLECTION OF IDEAS AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

FEBRUARY 15, 2014, 2014 THROUGH JANUARY 11, 2015

This installation focuses on everyday objects designed during the last few decades that have been acquired by the Museum not only because they met aesthetic and functional standards, but more importantly because they introduce new categories and forms. In particular this display features clusters of acquisitions that tackle the relationship between design and violence, responses to environmental and societal disruptions as well as the increasing importance of designs that focus on human interaction as in the eight video games on view that have been recently added to the MoMA permanent collection.

THE MODERN MONUMENT AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

ONGOING

Conceived around the theme of the modern monument, this new sculpture garden installation brings together diverse works including Barnett Newman’s, “Broken Obelisk” from 1967, a work which does not commemorate a specific event but instead serves as a symbolic monument for all people and Pablo Picasso’s, “Monument” from 1972, a memorial for the French poet Guillaume Apollinaire who died of influenza at the end of First World War. These two works are joined by, “Figurengruppe/Group of Figures,” nine boldly-colored, life-size figures, among them St. Michael, a Madonna, a giant and a snake created between 2006 and 2008 by German artist Katharina Fritsch.

CHRISTOPH SCHLINGENSIEF AT MOMA PS1

MARCH 9, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 31, 2014

Featuring installations, moving images and photography, this exhibit celebrates the transgressive output of German conceptualist Christoph Schlingensief whose versatile body of work includes studio art work as well as film, theater, opera and performance. Focusing on themes of fragmentation, synchronicity and the dissolution of boundaries, his work serves as both commentary and reaction to the social contexts from which it emerges, touching on topics including fascism, religion, German history, the institution of the family and the media’s representations of current events.

MARIA LASSNIG AT MOMA PS1

MARCH 9, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 7, 2014

Focusing on the self-portraiture of Maria Lassnig, one of the most important contemporary painters and a pioneer of artistic innovation, this exhibition presents fifty works by the almost one hundred year old Austrian artist, spanning all creative periods of her career, from her early involvement with graphic abstraction in Paris to her later shift to figural representation. Featuring works drawn from public and private collections as well as from the artist herself, most of which has never been before been publically displayed in the United States, this is the most significant survey of Lassnig’s work ever presented in North America, illuminating her revolutionary use of portraiture to present her internal world, painting the way her body feels to her from the inside rather than attempting to traditionally depict it from the outside.

JAMES LEE BYARS: 1/2 AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY AT MOMA PS1

JUNE 15, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 7, 2014

The most comprehensive museum survey in North America of James Lee Byars since his death in 1997, this exhibition, which highlights examples across a wide range of mediums including sculpture, installation, prose and performance art, takes its title from the artist’s, “1/2 autobiography,” which he wrote when he was 37 years old, then half an average lifespan of an adult male. Highlighting his remarkable body that is both intensely personal yet broadly universal, ranging from the monumental to the miniscule, the complex to the minimal and the spectacular to the barely visible, Byars’s work is meant to heighten the viewer experience by embracing contradictions while searching for perfection in an attempt to delineate the limits of human knowledge. Featuring pieces created over three decades of iconoclastic experimentation, the exhibit includes among the artist’s most celebrated creations such as, “Untitled (Performance Scroll,)” (1967), “The Sphere Book,” (1980), “The Conscience,” (1985) and, “The World Flag,” (1991).

GCC: ACHIEVEMENTS IN RETROSPECTIVE AT MOMA PS1

MARCH 23, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 7, 2014

A group of nine conceptual artists who refer to themselves as a, “delegation,” the GCC appropriates the English acronym of the, “Gulf Cooperation Council,” an economic and political consortium of Arabian Gulf nations, the group uses ministerial language, celebratory rituals, images and objects that circulate in social and political spheres associated with the Gulf to create videos, photographs, sculptures and installations. Highlighting Gulf culture as it unfolds in the present day, the GCC explores question about regional and national identity while drawing attention to both the benefits and the costs of the region’s breakneck transformation in recent decades.

KORAKRIT ARUNANONDCHAI AT MOMA PS1

MARCH 9, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 14, 2014

The first solo museum show devoted to Thai artist Korakrit Arunanondchai presents, “2012–2555,” a large-scale installation that explores the cyclical nature of life and memory by documenting the artist’s grandparents as they transform their family garden into an, “elderly home.” Shown along with, “2012–2555” are three series of paintings, “Untitled (Muen Kuey),” which features painted denim resulting from a reenactment of a controversial television presentation of Thai performance artist’s Duangjai Jansaunoi use of her body parts to create art, “Untitled (History Painting),” which focus on the idea that Western painting is responsible for shifts in global commerce and consumption and, “Untitled (White Temple Paintings),” which are inspired by the famous Wat Rong Kun (White Temple) in Northern Thailand designed and produced by the artist Chalermchai Kositpipat.

GAVIN KENYON : RELIQUARY VOID AT MOMA PS1

MARCH 16, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 14, 2014

For his first museum solo exhibition, sculptor Gavin Kenyon has created his largest work to date, “Pillar,” (2014), specifically for this installation in PS1’s soaring Duplex Gallery. Cast from concrete, this bulbous, asymmetric column which rises over 20 feet in the two-story space combines the classical with the grotesque, inspired by society’s shift from human-sized objects to dehumanizing works of monumental scale. The display also includes the debut of, “Shrouds” (2014),  a new series of textile-based, soft sculptural reliefs made from sections of found paintings as well as recycled remnants and furs used in previous castings which the artist has mounted with upholstery techniques to wooden supports, creating taut yet bulging forms that protrude into the gallery space.

DEGENERATE ART: THE ATTACK ON MODERN ART IN NAZI GERMANY, 1937 AT THE NEUE GALERIE

MARCH 13, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 1, 2014

"Departure" (1932) - Max Beckmann

“Departure” (1932) – Max Beckmann

Through fifty paintings and sculptures and thirty works on paper on loan from public and private collections around the world, by a range German modernists including Georg Grosz, Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Paul Klee, Georg Kolbe, Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Franz Marc, Ewald Mataré, Karel Niestrath, Emil Nolde, Christian Rohlfs and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff among the most notable, augmented by posters, photographs and other memorabilia, this exhibition restages the infamous display of “degenerate” modern art presented in Munich by the Nazi regime in 1937. Promoting the idea that modernism in art was part of the conspiracy by Jews to corrupt German society even though only six of the 112 artists included were indeed Jewish, the exhibit consisted of works appropriated from public museums and stolen from private collections, made in array of vanguard modernist styles, from Cubism to Expressionism to Dadaism to Surrealism to pure abstraction that Nazi authorities deemed demonstrations of degenerate qualities such as, “decadence,” “mental disease,” “racial impurity,” and, “weakness of character.”

POSTERS OF THE VIENNA SECESSION, 1898-1918 AT THE NEUE GALLERY

FEBRUARY 20, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 1, 2014

View a special exhibition dedicated to posters produced between 1898 and 1918 by the Vienna Secession, the groundbreaking artists’ association established in 1897 under the presidency of Gustav Klimt. Inspired by the Wagnerian concept of, “Gesamtkunstwerk,” or the, “total work of art,” Secession artists who incorporated both fine and decorative arts in their exhibitions dedicated great creative effort to producing posters and the exhibition includes work by the movement’s most celebrated artists including Gustav Klimt, Koloman Moser, Joseph Maria Olbrich and Egon Schiele.

JEFF KOONS: A RETROSPECTIVE AT THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

JUNE 27, 2014 THROUGH OCTOBER 19, 2014

“Michael Jackson and Bubbles” (1988) - Jeff Koons

“Michael Jackson and Bubbles” (1988) – Jeff Koons

Comprising almost 150 objects dating from 1978 to the present, this is the first and the most comprehensive career retrospective ever devoted to the groundbreaking oeuvre of Jeff Koons, one of the most controversial, influential and popular living artists. Among his notable achievements, Koons has pioneered new approaches to the readymade, broken the boundaries between fine art and mass culture, challenged the limits of industrial fabrication and transformed the relationship of artists to the global market while creating memorable works from the intimate to the monumental, in a range of mediums, that are at once whimsical, thoughtful, original and deliberately banal. Reconstituting all of his most iconic works and significant series in a chronological narrative that allows visitors to understand the artist’s remarkably diverse output as a multifaceted whole, the display features seminal creations such as, “Inflatable Flowers (Short Pink, Tall Purple),” (1979), “New Hoover Convertibles,” (1981-89), “One Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Spalding Dr. J 241 Series),” (1985), “Louis XIV,” (1986), “Michael Jackson and Bubbles,” (1988), “Ushering in Banality,” (1988),  “Balloon Dog,” (1994-2000), “Moon (Light Pink),” (1995–2000), “Tulips,” (1995–98), “Split-Rocker (Orange/Red),” (1999), “Loopy,” (1999), “Dutch Couple,” (2007), “Metallic Venus,” (2010 -12) and much more.

 

 

BROOKLYN MUSEUM

THE CLOISTERS

FRICK COLLECTION

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

MUSEUM OF MODERN ART (MoMA)

MoMA PS1

NEUE GALERIE

WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

 


 

 

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