Paris Art Exhibitions

Paris Art Exhibitions

CURRENT PARIS ART EXHIBITIONS


IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE FIRST PARISIANS AT THE CARNAVALET MUSEUM

SEPTEMBER 10, 2013 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2014

View a display of the archaeological discoveries made in 2008 from a site beside the Seine in the heart of Paris including the oldest human remains ever discovered in the city. Belonging to a camp of hunter-gatherers dating to approximately 8,000 B.C. during the Mesolithic Period, the presentation also focuses on the technical skills of this prehistoric tribe featuring tools and other personal objects as well as highlighting the painstaking archaeological field and lab work it took to excavate, catalogue and preserve the remains on view.

PARIS FREED, PARIS PHOTOGRAPHED, PARIS EXHIBITED AT THE CARNAVALET MUSEUM

JUNE 11, 2014 THROUGH FEBRUARY 8, 2015

Marking the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Paris, the Carnavalet presents a selection of images by Robert Doisneau, Jean Séeberger and René Zuber among many acclaimed photographers along with filmed interviews of participants and witnesses who document the Resistance movement in Paris during the Second World War highlighting their unique role in freeing the French capital from German occupation. This unique accumulation of documentary material also provides insight into how images are created during wartime and how over time photographs become subject to varying interpretations.

EUGÈNE DELACROIX: THE MOST LEGITIMATE OF SHAKESPEARE’S SONS AT THE DELACROIX MUSEUM

MARCH 26, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 31, 2014

Shakespeare’s works and the character of Hamlet in particular served as ongoing inspiration for Delacroix throughout his career and one of the artist’s first notable paintings, included in this exhibition, captures the scene of, “Hamlet and his Father’s Ghost,” (1825), painted when the artist was 27 years old. From the early 1830s onward, Delacroix created sixteen lithographs devoted to scenes from Hamlet, displayed here in their entirety along with the artist carved lithographic stones from which they were created. The museum’s other Shakespeare-related works are also featured including the artist’s moving rendition of, “Romeo and Juliet at the Tomb of the Capulets” (1846).

THE FLIGHT OF THE DRAGON: ROYAL ART OF VIETNAM AT THE GUIMET MUSEUM

JULY 9, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 15, 2014

Highlighting the importance in the art and culture of Vietnam of the dragon as a symbol of the both the bounty and capriciousness of nature, this extraordinary exhibition benefits from exceptional loans from the country’s leading arts institutions and includes at its core elements from the precious regalia of the Empire of Annam including exquisite works in gold and silver, on public view for the first time outside of Vietnam. Presented chronologically, the installation begins with Bronze Age examples dating to the first millennia B.C., including ritual drums and containers embellished with a fantastic and original bestiary of which the dragon is only one part, followed by works from the period of Han Chinese domination during the first to third centuries A.D. when the importance of the dragon as an iconographic image becomes entrenched illustrated by the rich funerary objects unearthed in the tombs north Vietnam that feature the feature the creatures as the sole focus. But it is after Vietnam regains independence in the tenth century that the image of the dragon realizes it most varied indigenous forms in masterpieces crafted of bronze, ceramic, gold and silver that testify to the creative power of a country steeped in Chinese culture yet expressing that culture with their own profound originality.

HARUNOBU: POET OF THE FEMININE AT THE GUIMET MUSEUM

JUNE 18, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 22, 2014

"Kanzan et Jittoku" (1765-70) - Suzuki Harunobu

“Kanzan et Jittoku” (1765-70) – Suzuki Harunobu

This is the first ever solo exhibition in France dedicated to eighteenth century artist Suzuki Harunobu, acknowledged as a master of color and brocade and one of the preeminent interpreters of the Japanese print. Among the most innovative of the Ukiyo-e print makers, his ability to manipulate pigment in the print making process allowed him to become among the first artists to emboss his work in a rainbow of colors when other artists were limited to only two or three shades. Particularly celebrated for his sophisticated representations of beautiful young women engaged in everyday activities, the 44 prints on display have all been chosen specially from the Guimet’s permanent collection and present an exceptional opportunity to view rare examples from the museum’s trove of 4,000 individual Japanese prints which are seldom publicly on view due to their fragile nature.

BIRTH OF A MUSEUM: LOUVRE ABU DHABI AT THE LOUVRE MUSEUM

MAY 2, 2014 THROUGH JULY 28, 2014

Unveiling for the first time in France highlights of the new Louvre Abu Dhabi collection, this exhibition is comprised of 150 of the finest masterpieces already acquired by this satellite institution in the UAE which opens in December of 2015. Spanning more than four millennia of human artistic achievement, among the exceptional works on display are paintings by Bellini, Caillebotte, Gauguin, Jordaens, Magritte, Manet and Twombly, a previously unseen collage by Picasso, a thirteenth century tribal totem from Mali, a tenth century, sculpture of Shiva Dancing from India, a fifth century gold and garnet brooch from Italy and a gold bracelet with figures of lions made in Iran nearly 3,000 years ago. Presenting the works as they are gradually accessioned will allow the public to preview the cultural ambitions and wealth of this new collection which is accompanied by plans and models of the new facility in which they will be displayed designed by acclaimed architect Jean Nouvel.

MASKS, MASQUERADES AND MASCARONS AT THE LOUVRE MUSEUM

JUNE 19, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 22, 2014

One hundred fascinating works in a variety of media including painting, drawing, engraving and sculpture presented alongside an array of archaeological artifacts explore the mask as paradox, both a religious element and object of vanity, concealing yet revealing, horrifying and seductive, imitative but misleading. Spanning 4,000 years of human history, the installation focuses on five specific areas including Sacred Masks, Carnival Masks, Commedia dell’arte Masks, Funerary Masks and Mascarons (masks used as ornamentation in architecture and design.) Highlights of the display include a, “Phoenician Funeral Mask,” (1300 B.C.) fabricated in gold, “Greek Comedy and Tragedy Masks,” (second century A.D.) intricately carved into a marble sarcophagus lid, a terracotta, Florentine, “Death Mask of an Woman,” (fifteenth century), an unsigned, French, watercolor of a, “Figure in a Plumed Mask, Profile to the Right,” (1638), Perino del Vaga’s drawing of, “Three Commedia dell’arte Masks,” (1639), Wenceslaus Hollar’s etching of a mysterious masked woman in, “Winter,” (1643) and Claude Gillot’s painting, “The Two Coaches,” (1712–16) that captures an elaborately masked Carnival goer.

CLAUDE LÉVÊQUE: THE BIGGEST TENT IN THE WORLD AT THE LOUVRE MUSEUM

APRIL 2, 2014 THROUGH JANUARY 2, 2015

This exhibition presents the debut work of the Louvre’s current contemporary artist in residence, Claude Lévêque, who has created a work of incandescent light to adorn the museum’s celebrated I.M. Pei pyramid. Fashioned from neon, the signature medium of choice for Lévêque, his installation strikes great bolts of light that slice though air sending prisms through the pyramid’s glass structure that scatter their reflections on the surrounding palace walls creating patterns of dancing illumination day and night.

THE 50S: FASHION IN FRANCE, 1947-1957 AT THE MUSEUM OF FASHION

JULY 12, 2014 THROUGH NOVEMBER 2, 2014

"New Look" (1947) - Christian Dior

“New Look” (1947) – Christian Dior

Featuring 100 exquisite garments and accessories designed by the most famous couturiers of the 1950s from Balenciaga, Chanel and Schiaparelli to Cardin, Dior and Givenchy, this exhibition celebrates the golden age of French haute couture when Paris reemerged as the fashion capital of the world following the privations of the Depression and Second World War. Highlighting remarkable individual pieces from the museum’s permanent collection which are rarely on display due to their fragility, the installation explores the evolution of the fashionable female form from the birth of Dior’s revolutionary New Look in 1947 characterized by a wasp waist and full skirt employing yards of fabric to the emergence of Yves Saint Laurent’s own revolutionary aesthetic following Dior’s untimely death in 1957.

LUCIO FONTANA RETROSPECTIVE AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

APRIL 25, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 24, 2014

200 sculptures, paintings, ceramics and installations provide an overview of the atypical path forged by Argentine born, Italian identified artist Lucio Fontana, acknowledged as one of the great visionaries of twentieth century art whose work deeply influenced several generations of artists particularly those who came of age in the 1960s. An artist whose style was always in flux, he was one of the first Italian abstract artists in the 1930s and became the leading figure of the Spacialist Movement in the post-war era embodied in his ceramic sculptures, his perforated canvases and his manifesto based installations. This display presents the artist’s extraordinary body of work created between the 1920’s and his death in 1968, ranging from simple, clean, conceptual gestures to baroque pieces in profusions of colors and materials, in chronological order reflecting his key cycles including primitive and abstract sculptures, drawings, polychrome ceramics, Spatialist works, punctured canvases, Art Informel works, installations, Tagli (cuts), Nature, Fine di Dio, Olii,Venezie, Metalli and Teatrini.

UNEDITED HISTORY: IRAN 1960-2014 AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

MAY 16, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 24, 2014

Consisting of 200 works, most never before seen in France, this exhibition presents a survey of the visual culture of Iran from the 1960s up to the present highlighting the role artists have played in broadening perceptions of modern day Iran. Featuring selections in a variety of media from painting and graphic arts to photography and film from twenty-six artists including historic figures such as Bahman Mohassess, Behdjat Sadr, Kaveh Golestan and Bahman Jalali as well members of the contemporary scene such as Barbad Golshiri and Arash Hanaei, the display is arranged in sequences featuring examples produced from the years 1960–1970, the revolutionary era of 1979, the Iran-Iraq war era (1980–1988) and the postwar period until today

CARPEAUX: A SCULPTOR FOR THE EMPIRE AT THE ORSAY MUSEUM

JUNE 24, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 28, 2014

"Ugolino and his Sons" (1862) - Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux

“Ugolino and his Sons” (1862) – Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux

This major retrospective explores the life and work of the exceptionally gifted, nineteenth century artist Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux, heir to Michelangelo and inspiration to Rodin, whose theatrical, anatomically realistic sculptures appear to capture flesh and blood in stone and define dramatic French Second Empire style. Comprised of 85 sculptures, 20 paintings and 60 drawings including 50 selections from the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Carpeaux’s birthplace of Valenciennes which holds the greatest collection of the artist’s oeuvre, the exhibition highlights the evolution of ten individual sculptural masterpieces including his renowned, “Ugolino and His Sons,” (1862), “The Triumph of Flora,” (1866) and, “The Dance,” (1867) from sketch to plaster or terra cotta version to finished work carved in marble or cast in bronze. The display also encourages the public to rediscover Carpeaux’s highly accomplished although somewhat forgotten canvases which depict in detailed royal portraits and scenes of glittering balls all the extravagance and grandeur of the court of Napoleon III.

PARIS 1900: CITY OF ENTERTAINMENT AT THE PETIT PALAIS MUSEUM

APRIL 2, 2014 THROUGH AUGUST 17, 2014

“Marcelle Lender Dancing the Bolero” (1896) - Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

“Marcelle Lender Dancing the Bolero” (1896) – Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Totaling 600 individual works from painting and sculpture to posters and prints to photographs and films to decorative objects and fine furniture to jewelry and gowns, this exhibit transports visitors back to Belle Époque Paris at the turn-of-the-twentieth century when fifty million people from around the world descended on the city for the Universal Exposition. Presented in the magnificent galleries of the Petit Palais, an architectural tour de force constructed specifically for the exposition itself, this installation offers an invitation to relive the legendary sophistication and splendor of Paris in 1900 through six themed pavilions including those devoted to Impressionist painting and Modernist sculpture with works by Cézanne, Maillol, Monet, Pissarro, Renoir, Rodin and Vuillard, Art Nouveau decorative objects with works by Gallé, Guimard, Lalique, Majorelle and Mucha, fashion and style featuring apparel by Charles-Frédéric Worth and Falize jewelry by Henri Vever surrounded by large portraits of fabulously attired society mavens by Besnard and La Gandara as well as canvases depicting the world of milliners and dressmakers by Jean Béraud and Edgar Degas, entertainment ranging from posters documenting the triumphs of Sarah Bernhardt and the successes of Yvette Guilbert to those advertising legendary venues such as Le Chat Noir and  Moulin Rouge created by artists like Toulouse-Lautrec, the demimonde of courtesans like Liane de Pougy and La Belle Otero as captured in photos that reveal another Paris awash in drugs and prostitution plus a final pavilion commemorating the grandeur of the Universal Exposition through architectural drawings of its notable structures like the Petit Palais and the Grand Palais as well as documentary films that show the exposition in real time accompanied by rare ephemera like picturesque souvenirs and pieces of scenery.

THE MYTH OF CLEOPATRA AT THE PINACOTHÈQUE DE PARIS

APRIL 10, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 7, 2014

Broad and deep, this fascinating exhibition celebrating Cleopatra, the legendary Queen of Egypt, features 350 objects, from ancient archaeological treasures excavated in Egypt, Greece and Rome which interpret her historical reality to paintings, sculpture, decorative arts and even film, opera and theater costumes and props from the sixteenth century to the present which highlight the mythology that arose around her as a female Pharaoh, Caesar’s lover, Marc Antony’s wife and the most bewitching woman who ever lived. Drawn from private collections and major arts institutions around the world including the Cairo Museum, the Egyptian Museum in Turin and the Museums of the Vatican, among the most unique selections are a lifelike, marble portrait from the first century A.D. known as the, “Head of Turin,” which has only recently been authenticated as a rendering of Cleopatra, nineteenth century painter Achille Glisenti’s dramatic, monumental canvas, “Cleopatra’s Suicide,” (1878) and extravagant costumes worn by Elizabeth Taylor in the title role of the 1963 film version of, “Cleopatra,” at the time, the most expensive movie ever made.

MAN RAY, PICABIA AND THE REVIEW “LITTÉRATURE” (1922-1924) AT THE POMPIDOU CENTER

JULY 2, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 8, 2014

Debuting to the public for the first time the recently rediscovered, twenty-six, original covers designed by Francis Picabia in the early twenties for the review, “Littérature,” this exciting exhibition sheds light on a crucial period in the history of modern art, between the end of the Dadaist movement and the advent of Surrealism. Only the printed versions of the covers were known to exist until 2008 when Picabia’s original drawings were found in an envelope in a Paris Art gallery and donated to the Pompidou permanent collection. This exhibition also highlights the contributions to, “Littérature,” made by American photographer Man Ray, presenting several of his seminal images which have become icons of photographic modernity including, “L’Élevage de poussière (Dust Breeding),” (1920) and, “Le Violon d’Ingres (Ingres’s Violin),” (1924) that first appeared inside the pages of the magazine.

MAGICIANS OF THE EARTH (MAGICIENS DE LA TERRE): A LOOK BACK AT A LEGENDARY EXHIBITION AT THE POMPIDOU CENTER

JULY 2, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 8, 2014

This exhibition revisits a legendary Pompidou exhibition mounted in 1989, “Magiciens de la terre (Magicians of the Earth),” which highlighted the work of a range of contemporary artists from the non-Western world, in particular Africa, Asia, Latin American and Oceania. Featuring archives, documents, ephemera, photos and a contemporary mural by the artist Sarkis created just for this occasion that pays tribute to the 113 artists involved in the original exhibition, the display explores how the initial, ground-breaking exhibition revolutionized the art scene by redefining Primitivism and recognizing the forthcoming globalization of contemporary art.

MARTIAL RAYSSE AT THE POMPIDOU CENTER

MAY 14, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 22, 2014

Through over two hundred examples, from paintings to drawings, sculptures to assemblages and films to photographs, this retrospective pays tribute to the work of visionary, French, contemporary artist Martial Raysse. Rejecting the dominant artistic trends of the post war period, for the last five decades Raysse has forged his own unpredictable, experimental, irreverent, iconoclastic path, combining plastic and stainless steel scrap consumer items plundered from thrift shops, which he organizes into boxes and translucent columns creating airy works of, “vision hygiene,” as he describes them that are often compared to the works of Alexander Calder.

PLURAL MODERNITIES FROM 1905 TO 1970 AT THE POMPIDOU CENTER

OCTOBER 23, 2013 THROUGH JANUARY 26, 2015

"Girl in the Green Dress" (1930) - Tamara de Lempicka

“Girl in the Green Dress” (1930) – Tamara de Lempicka

This exhibition reveals the sheer variety, size and international focus of the Pompidou permanent collection, not only one of the world’s most impressive in terms of quality but also because it represents the largest number of individual artist from the greatest number of countries. Covering all fields of creation including architecture, collage, design, drawing, film, installation, painting, photography, printing and sculpture, the display is composed of over 1,000 works by 400 artists from 47 nations around the world presenting a survey of the global history of Modern art during the first seven decades of the twentieth century with a specific emphasis on examples from the non-European world particularly on selections from Latin American with 740 works by 176 artists from thirteen different countries including examples by Emiliano Di Cavalcanti, Mario Carreno, Julia Codesido, Gyula Kosice, Vicente do Rego Monteiro, Joaquín Torres- García, Wifredo Lam, Roberto Matta, Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Jesús Rafael Soto. Another focus is on women with examples from 48 individual artists working in 19 different countries within a wide range of artistic expressions including examples by Maria Blanchard, Huguette Caland, Sonia Delaunay, Natalia Goncharova, Frida Kahlo, Tamara de Lempicka, Maruja Mallo, Chana Orloff, Alicia Penalba, Suzanne Roger and Pan Yuliang. Also making a debut in a dedicated gallery are examples of modernist Asian works including examples from Asian artists established in Western countries like Léonard Foujita, Liu Haisu, Takanori Oguiss and Zao Wou-Ki as well as Chinese and Japanese artists who adapted modern characteristics in their native countries like Xu Beihong, Zhang Daqian, Yun Gee, Wang Yachen, Kazumasa Yamashita and San Yu. Additional galleries are dedicated to the emergence of Modern art in Africa featuring works by Baya, Marcel Gotene, Ernest Mancoba and Irma Stern, in the Middle East featuring works by Mahmoud Mokhtar and Bejat Sadr and in Indian featuring the work of Raj Rewal, all on view for the very first time.

A HISTORY OF ART, ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN FROM THE 80S TO TODAY AT THE POMPIDOU CENTER

JULY 2, 2014 THROUGH MARCH 7, 2016

Paintings, drawings, sculptures, installations, videos, films, photographs, architectural models and art objects by 180 artists and 50 architects and designers from 55 countries including Pawe? Althamer, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Mircea Cantor, Etienne Chambaud, Ay?e Erkmen, Georges Fessy, Samuel Fosso, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Thomas Hirschhorn, Zhang Huan, Andrew Kudless, Kengo Kuma, Ahmed Mater, Jean Nouvel, Gabriel Orozco, Tony Oursler, Steven Parrino and David Trubridge among many, present an overview of the art and design of the past three decades. Drawn from the Pompidou permanent collection, most works are on exhibit for the first time since their acquisition or donation calling attention in particular to non-Western artists whose work had often gone ignored in the past as well as the role of globalization as a dominant artistic theme. Highlights of the installation include Basquiat’s, “Slave Auction,” (1982), Erkmen’s, “Netz,” (2006), Fosso’s, “The Liberated American Woman of the 1970s,” (1997), Gonzalez-Torres’s, “Untitled (Last Light),” (1993), Hirschhorn’s, “Outgrowth,” (2005), Huan’s, “Family Tree,” (2000), Nouvel’s, “Prototype for the Institut du Monde Arabe,” (1981-1987) and Orozco’s, “Eaten Hose (Manguera Mordida),” (1990).

TIKI POP: THE POLYNESIAN PARADISE AND THE AMERICAN DREAM AT THE QUAI BRANLY MUSEUM

JUNE 24, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 28, 2014

Through a collection of authentic Polynesian Tikis juxtaposed against a treasure trove of mid-twentieth century objects, from books and records, to furniture and home accessories, to prints, posters, paintings and more, this exhibition explores how an exotic ocean deity became and remains a cultural icon. Followed from its genesis during the U.S. post-War boom when Americans escaped their conformist culture into the fantasy of a carefree life in the islands of the South Seas, epitomized in the popularity of Tiki Bars and Hawaiian vacations, the display demonstrates not only the diversity and inventiveness of Tiki forms in all walks of life but documents the process of how an ancient god of non-Western origin is commercialized into a god of entertainment.

TATTOOISTS, TATTOOED AT THE QUAI BRANLY MUSEUM

MAY 6, 2014 THROUGH OCTOBER 18, 2015

This exhibit explores tattoos and tattoo artists not only through the prism of art but also through ethnology, following the art of tattooing from its birth and ritual use in Polynesia, Japan and Thailand to its adoption as a globalized cultural trend and widespread form of personal expression. From films, paintings, photos and texts to most impressively and innovatively, silicone torsos, arms and legs that were sent to the far reaches of the globe so that the most renowned tattooists including Tin-Tin, Filip Leu, Xed Lehead, Jack Rudy, Horiyoshi III, Mark Kopua and Chimé could perform their art in an authentic manner that is faithful to the real process of creating works of art that employ human skin as a canvas. The exhibit also gathers rare and vintage tools of the trade and pays tribute to Leo Zulueta and Don Ed Hardy, also known for a tattoo inspired clothing line, two Americans who through their 1980s magazine, “Tattootime,” brought recognition to non-Western tattooists who used traditional tools and tribal and ethnic motifs, influencing their adoption by both artists and the tattooed masses in the West.

MAPPLETHORPE-RODIN AT THE RODIN MUSEUM

APRIL 8, 2014 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 21, 2014

"Michael Reed" (1987) - Robert Mapplethorpe / "The Walking Man" (1907) - Auguste Rodin

“Michael Reed” (1987) – Robert Mapplethorpe / “The Walking Man” (1907) – Auguste Rodin

Sculpture and photography are unified through the work of two major artists in a single exhibition as the Rodin Museum brings together the works of Robert Mapplethorpe and Auguste Rodin, the first time masterpieces by these two renowned figures have been publicly displayed in concert. Made possible through exceptional loans from the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation in New York, the installation is divided into sections including, “Movement and Tension,” “Black and White/Light and Shadow,” “Eroticism,” and, “Damnation,” presenting 50 Rodin sculptures from the museum’s permanent alongside 102 Mapplethorpe photographs, highlighting a common vocabulary of subject and theme arising from both artists’ passion for the human form most strikingly revealed in the pairing of Rodin’s monumental bronze, “The Walking Man,” (1907) and Mapplethorpe’s study of, “Michael Reed,” (1987) which uses shadow and light on its subject to echo the sculpture’s celebrated pose.


PARIS MUSEUMS


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